Waiakea Water the Revolution in the CPG Industry

Through the years the beverage industry and the bottled water industry have all been about manipulating polymers to have a much more durable bottle. However having a robust, sustainable bottle means having a longer shelf life which is a danger to the environment. Waiakea Hawaiian volcanic water CEO Ryan Emmons found an opportunity in the market which he has exploited with his environmentally-friendly bottles. His new packaging has a shelf life of 15 years which is 1000 times better than its other counterparts. With the use of carbon-based wax, they can create a biodegradable material since beeswax is organic, during the manufacturing process, plastic chemical bonds are substituted with weaker links and hence finally having a re-engineered Nano degraded plastic which is weak thus easily decomposes.

The bottled water influenced came from the Hawaiian culture which lays focus on land rather than riches. He gets his water from aquifers in Mauna Lona volcano which is accessible, and healthy for consumption, the aquifers are estimated to be about half a billion gallon and compared to the 2 million daily consumers it goes to prove that the company’s resource is sustainable. The water comes from rainwater and also moisture from northern winds. The water comes from a remote location, therefore, eliminating the risks of any contaminants such as carbon rain. As the water travels through a stream, it undergoes a rare purification process, removing any acidity and thus making the water alkaline. The company is unique, unlike other companies which have to use an ion exchanger to make their water less acidic, there is an entirely natural process. The physical process has more benefits than the average consumer may not be aware.

While coming up with the bottle, there were two main barriers. Recreating the plastic material by disintegrating it in such a way it didn’t lose its initial qualities. The second was having their patent approved on the degradation of plastics which is very rare. There is a significant concern that with all this modification the costs of development would rise. However one pound of additive is equivalent to 1000 pounds of plastics, thus the little cost of production. The weak cross-links in the bottle make it readily degradable to its main polymer and therefore ease in recycling. This technology will soon revolutionize the CPG industry and end our long quest for environmentally friendly plastics.